Feeding the Tribe (Gardening thread - Off Topic)

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Gang Hero
Oct 7, 2017
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Manchester UK
Managed to get a lift with the peppers, melons and cucumbers to the plot just before it got dark. Will be up to the plot early to get them all planted. Looking like I'll need to relocate some of the salad crop but it'll go inbetween the rows nicely so no waist there. :)

I'll also be cropping baby salad leave tomorrow. :p
 
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Kitcar

Gang Hero
Jan 3, 2017
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St. Louis, Illinois, USA
Managed to get a lift with the peppers, melons and cucumbers to the plot just before it got dark. Will be up to the plot early to get them all planted. Looking like I'll need to relocate some of the salad crop but it'll go inbetween the rows nicely so no waist there. :)

I'll also be cropping baby salad leave tomorrow. :p
I am putting in a floating garden for lettuce, and maybe a few of the hot peppers. $50 jalapeno.
 

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Gang Hero
Oct 7, 2017
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Lol ... Feel like I'm about to make a fool of myself but a $50 jalapeño? Is that a type or the price you paid?

If you buy fresh pepper/chillies just whip the seeds out and dry on a paper towel then sow them. No need to pay daft prices!!!

The floating idea works well with lettuce. Especially if you've got fish as well.
 

Kitcar

Gang Hero
Jan 3, 2017
1,557
1,287
128
St. Louis, Illinois, USA
Lol ... Feel like I'm about to make a fool of myself but a $50 jalapeño? Is that a type or the price you paid?

If you buy fresh pepper/chillies just whip the seeds out and dry on a paper towel then sow them. No need to pay daft prices!!!

The floating idea works well with lettuce. Especially if you've got fish as well.
Noo.. The cost of the garden. 4" flexible drainage tube stuffed with 4" diameter PowerAid bottles with plastic garden fencing stretched over it and a containment system for the top of the root mass. I think each pepper will thusly cost me about $50. Then there will be the cleanup labor getting it in shape so it will work again next year...
 

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Gang Hero
Oct 7, 2017
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Manchester UK
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Polystyrene-plant-trays-growing-plugs/dp/B00IIKVU08

If you can find something like this it floats and no need to spend lots. Just find packaging with a big enough space for the roots. You'll be recycling packaging and it should work out free or very cheap other than the compost.

Though peppers don't like their roots constantly wet. I had fungal die back issues with my peppers which was solved by just not watering them as much. They like infrequent watering
 
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Gang Hero
Oct 7, 2017
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Manchester UK
The main thing I've got to work floating on top of a water butt is lettuce. That's got a small root system. Things like salad leaves, small herbs and possibly spring onions I can see working but not bigger rooted plants. They won't have enough soil to be stable and will struggle to get enough nutrients without really messing up the water.

When things like toms and cucumbers are grown in aquaponic set up they use an ebb and flow system where gravel beds are flooded with nutrient rich water for a given time every few hours so the plants have something to grow roots in.

The USDA does lots of research on different methods of growing. Might be worth checking their site to see what extra info is available. I like the USDA site as it covers research in more growing conditions than other online resources ...

https://www.nal.usda.gov

The UK one is DEFRA and it's search functionality is crap.

There's also lots of research that's available online for peer review via different Universities. These can be a decent research tool if you want to try something new. I like researching in this way and looking at the raw data to come up with my own take on the results.
 

ThreeDice

Gang Hero
May 27, 2014
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Added to the raised beds yesterday with replenishing soil, and gave them another weed out. Tomatoes will go in soon. Given the shed a good two coats of paint, third tomorrow. I have two weeks to strip the roots out of the patch I'm working before beans go in. Was hoping to sift the soil before, but working alone and not physically stable, so that might have to wait. Cut down a holly tree; shame as they are beautiful, but it was an accident that grew in between the borders, and was a danger. Shifted a load of rubble, stripped Ivy, will be painting a wall and brickwork. Might have a wasp nest somewhere as they've been mental in the hedges. New pond is full of lovely spawn.

A new fence will be put in either later this year, or early next. After that happens there will be more raised beds and the old pond reworked.

First blossoms on the new trees, which are beautiful. The plum looks like it might survive the sea air.

The place is taking shape.
 

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Gang Hero
Oct 7, 2017
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Manchester UK
First harvest off the allotment this season with just over 800g of mixed lettuce and turnip greens (need to sow more as they're yum). :D

Not bad to say they were filling a gap while my French Beans germinate, hope I'll get another two or three harvests from the same plants. :p

The potatoes are coming up nicely a bit in advance of most others in the allotment. Heard two of the old blokes talking about my plot and wondering what newfangled tricks I had up my sleeve. Funny thing is I've been asking them for advice and one of them said he had success growing spuds in containers early in a mix of wood chippings and horse muck. All I did was turn the container into a big bed.
 
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AndeeT

Ganger
Apr 16, 2016
112
166
43
Palmerston North, New Zealand
Any tips on preparing soil for growing veg? Just moved into a new house with a sizeable (for London) garden. Was looking to turn half of it into veggie patches.

I found some old gardening books from the 70’s and they all talked about ‘double digging’ AKA ‘bastard trenching’. I did a small strip with this technique and well....now I know where that pseudonym comes from! Here’s what I achieved over the course of a week;
View media item 31254
‘Twas indeed a bastard.

Away from the house the soil seemed half decent but close to the house the bottom 8 inches were mostly clay and a lot of pebbles. I chucked out as many pebbles as I could.

Maybe I dug too deep. I removed about the top 12 inches of turf and soil and then forked over the next 8 inches or so.

This is my first time growing veg (or growing anything), so I’m unsure how much space the roots will want. We are starting with; courgettes, tomatoes, peas, corn, aubergine, salad, squash, peppers.

Will the pebbles be a problem? The clay only becomes apparent once you go over a foot down.
 

Tiny

Hive Guilder
Tribe Council
Jul 12, 2011
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South Wales, UK
www.tinyworlds.co.uk
First off put the spade down!!!

Pull up a chair, grab a brew then watch this ...

Love Charles, he's so great. He has a load of videos on no-dig gardening and even has an experimental bed where half is no-dig and the other half is traditional tilled soil and the no-dig wins every year.

There's a load of other good YouTube channels to look in my post back on page 5, most of which have great videos on starting a garden.
 
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Gang Hero
Oct 7, 2017
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Manchester UK
I'm about to build 3 more no dig raised beds in the next week or two. Can take some pics while I'm at it If you want.

Looking at your soil it looks like it's just lacking in humus which is easy to add. You want to make the soil attractive to worms and then let them do the digging for you.

If I was to start from where you are I'd put the sods of turf back but turned upside down (roots in the air and the grass touching the earth) that will add humus to the soil. Next get a 3' or 4' stack of newspapers, yes that's fset not inches you need more than you think. Mark out where your having the bed and make a frame. Lay down several layers of newspaper making sure to set them so they don't keep blowing away. I use the free ones you get on public transport. I open them out and overlap slightly with the next layer overlapping the joints. If your putting down a path I make this layer to 6" last the edge of the bed. Then if you have kitchen scraps (veg pealings/egg shells/chit peal/coffee grounds (just not fat/meat/dairy) make a layer just keep it a good 6" away from the edge of the bed to avoid attracting vermin. If you can get composted manure stick this in as well. Then top off with a really thick layer of compost. From experience it needs to be at least 4" but more is better.

You can then plant in it straight away!