My attempt at rust and flaking paint...

Necroplayer

Ganger
Oct 14, 2012
158
136
78
Kentwood, LA, USA
I wanted to get away from my traditional grey on grey paint job on my terrain. So I started looking at old (over a hundred years) sawmills and other derelict machinery around paying close attention to any paint that happened to survive the ravages of time (which wasn't much!). Attached is my attempt at replicating the colors and general look and what I found. I think it would look right at home in the underhive! What do you think? Any opinions would be appreciated!
 

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Necroplayer

Ganger
Oct 14, 2012
158
136
78
Kentwood, LA, USA
Thanks AndyT81! Its really easy to do. First, I LIGHTLY sprayed the pieces of terrain with "fleckstone", a stone texture, from about 12 to 16 inches away. Second, spray flat black. I use the $.99 cent cans of Krylon . Third, stipple Folkart Burnt Sienna mixed with Black until you get a dark almost black brown. Old rust is very dark. Fourth, drybrush Americana Milk Chocolate lightly in some places and slightly heavier in others. Fifth, Lightly stipple Americana orange where you're planning to put the flaking paint. Sixth, lightly stipple the color of your flaking paint over the orange making sure you can sill see the other colors underneath. I used a industrial green color but just about any will look good! Seventh, lightly drybrush over the flaking paint with the orange. Eighth, lastly and what I forgot to do before posting the pics, give the thing a black wash. This will tie everything together and bring out the colors. If you give it a try please let me know how it works for you!
 
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Necroplayer

Ganger
Oct 14, 2012
158
136
78
Kentwood, LA, USA
Glad you all like!
Loriel- You can do this too! I just wanted an easier way than the salt, hairspray, masking fluid, etc. methods that have been used for years. Paint and brushes are all you need!
ClockworkOrange-Thanks!
Tulkas- This was originally a plastic downspout for a gutter. I just removed the male end (eek!), and added some plastic screen, plasticard strips, and punched out rivets. And as with all plastic that I work with, I gave it a light sanding with some fine sandpaper.
 

Necroplayer

Ganger
Oct 14, 2012
158
136
78
Kentwood, LA, USA
King Redwart- I use different thicknesses of plasticard. If I remember correctly, these were made from .015mm card. I make them using a hole punch found in the scrapbooking section at Hobby Lobby. They have different sizes and shapes of hole punches. I find these give a nice roundish top to the rivet.
 

Tulkas

Mr. Shadowlord
Mordheim Professor
Mar 23, 2012
2,181
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Netherlands, Groningen
Erm, there was a brilliant post about rivets made using glue-on nail beads (like girls glue on their nails, not carpenters). Was like 1500 of them for a pound. Let me find it.
 
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SNxWMxN

Gang Champion
Jun 10, 2014
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When I actually finish any of my terrain pieces, I believe I will be giving this a try! Thanks for the info!
 

Necroplayer

Ganger
Oct 14, 2012
158
136
78
Kentwood, LA, USA
Tiny and SNxWMxN- Thanks! Glad you like! Here are the hole punches that I use. As you can see, one has been slightly modified to "dimple" the plastic. With the little "catch door?" removed you can use the punch hole to aim exactly where you want your rivet to be. If/ when you accidently punch one completely through, you can either glue it back on or just say its a missing rivet. It also makes great rounded head rivets. The second one with the door still attached is more straight forward. It's for punching out masses of rivets. Also, if you have patterned plasticard with small lines, and you take care, you can make cool looking screw heads. the older "flat head" ones as opposed to the newer "Phillips head" (the little crosses). Hope this helps!
 

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