Sudsy builds with paper...

So, I created a thread showing off some paper projects I did and got a whole bunch of great feedback. I also got a lot of questions. So, based on the curiosity, I figured I'd create a living build thread showing works in progress under a Painting Log and leave the other thread with the completed items. I'm going to start with some notes about how I get started. This is my process, and it has evolved based on a lot of experience. Some of that experience is mine, otherwise, other people shared what they did, and I merely stand upon the shoulders of giants. What giants? Well, I know many of you all out there probably have an account on DakkaDakka, so if I mention some names, they will be familiar (or at least searchable). Silveroxide started this whole mess with his thread, from there I encountered Blackadder and his massive titans made using plasti-card (which share a great many methods with paper models), Armorman (from Zealot), and Vermin King (from Cardboard Warriors). Then there are the great designers like Chris Foss from Ebles Miniatures (who is a swell guy for putting alll thos models out there for free), Eli Patoroch (who's designs I tend to find myself building most of the time), and Jim Bowden. I'm merely enjoying the fruits of their labor in my spare time building more than I have ever done prior. Without their work, my model building would never have reached this point!

So, ideas for your project. No shortage of those now is there? For this first one, I wanted a classic Rouge Trader era Landraider MK I. After much research, not only are they out of production, but the few you can find are expensive on online auction! I enjoyed watching one of these come together on a build thread, but was sad to see how rare such builds are. So I dug around (Armorman's thread on Zealot, Warhammer Papercrafters group on Facebook, etc) and found a nice Landraider that matched the RT era design.

For my first step, I print the instructions in color. Patorch makes nice PDF documents, so I printed the first five pages on normal paper. I then selected the component pages I wanted to print (in my case, the black and white that I will paint later). Being the US, I had to special order some A4 size paper on Amazon, in my case it was index card stock running around 80#/215 GSM weight. Index stock has nice tooth, like those cards you can get, only A4 size; however it is very susceptible to moisture and warps easy. So to solve this dilema, after printing the component sheets, I spray them with clear coat (satin, matte, or flat finish depending on brand). Follow all safety precautions when using spray paint, safety first! Make sure you spray each sheet front and back, and get that clear coat to soak into those pages. It doesn't need to be too thick, but you want to seal the pages. This is quite handy if you model at my pace (an hour here, 10 minutes there, life is busy with kids and their activities...). Make sure you let each side of the paper dry thoroughly before flipping over and spraying the other side! I live in a river valley, so humidity is always a concern with any paper projects, so you can imagine that I certainly learned quite a bit by ERROR in the Trial and Error method of experience!


So, until next post, happy greebling!
 

spafe

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Have you considered printing onto a nice quality paper, then glueing the paper (using artists spray on glue for backing boards etc) onto foamcore? This will give more rigidity to the model, mean it doesnt have any warping and be longer laster. Just a thought
 

nooker

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The main problem I have found is not rigidity (which can be an issue), but weight. Since I'm using it on a gaming board with painted models, people are already being careful, so usually not really a problem with stuff getting crushed. Now, paper stuff can be really light, so bumping it out of place with a light tap happens a lot. I often put pebbles in them to counter act this.
 
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Have you considered printing onto a nice quality paper, then glueing the paper (using artists spray on glue for backing boards etc) onto foamcore? This will give more rigidity to the model, mean it doesnt have any warping and be longer laster. Just a thought

I typically skip the photo paper, not because I do not like the incredible surface finish of a good matte picture printed on such paper, but expense drives my decision. 250 pages of index stock, and a botyle of clear coat costs less combined than the matte photo paper I use for printing pictures. That, and I paint my models. So how my parts look out of the printer is secondary. Index card stock takes my abuse better when my glue gets messy (part of why I paint...).

Later, as I cut, I use a ball end tool to crease folds, or add panel seam lines. Index and bristol both take this rather well, not certain on photo papers.

When I need strength, I use glue stick (or spray adhesive if it is a whole page) and laminate a couple layers together or glue to cereal box (raiding the recycle bin, see, this is a green hobby.... well, all of us keep piles of stuff to scratch build with much to the dismay of our loved ones at times...).

Examples forhcoming!
 

MusingWarboss

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I’ve always wanted a Rogue Trader Land Raider!! Wouldn’t mind a few extra Rhinos too but as you said ... the expense online!! Ahhhh!! Just not worth it.

This however, gets my interest. Could it be adapted to plasticard for extra rigidity??
 
I’ve always wanted a Rogue Trader Land Raider!! Wouldn’t mind a few extra Rhinos too but as you said ... the expense online!! Ahhhh!! Just not worth it.

This however, gets my interest. Could it be adapted to plasticard for extra rigidity??

Yes, thes are easily adapted to plasticard, just omit the fold tabs and cut/sand to fit! Check out Blackadder's titan builds on DakkaDakka or Zealot for ideas. Armorman (Zealot and PaperModellers have those threads) has a thread with links to Patoroch's and others who created the paper templates of many out of print or not currently produced vehicles.
 
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So, on to the first build session outside of the preparation I demonstrated above. Brace yourself for a truely picture heavy experience. Constructive criticism reuested along with any questions you might have. As mentioned in my introduction above, I'm merely standing on the shoulders of giants who have provided much of what I am posting in their own build threads on Zealot and PaperModelers. So here is an introduction to this aspect of the wargame hobby, and what happens to those pages I sprayed.


First, we gather our tools. Here are the most important ones in my opinion. First would be the hobby knife (with No. 11 blade) and a cutting surface (not pictured, but you can bet it was there because this is my dining room table where I eat dinner...). Second is the strait edge with a metal edge for guiding the knife in strait cuts, my preferance is a stainless steel ruler with a cork back to keep it from slipping. Third MOST important tool is the ball end tool with at least on ball end that is less than 1mm or so; I recently learned this from someone who recommended it for all bends, because unlike scoring the bend with a hobby knife, the bend can go either direction without compromising the surface of the paper. Finally, you need really good glue; a good glue stick (that won't warp the paper) and wood glue or other low moisture content PVA glue (in North America, the US specifically, I use Titebond II or III and avoid Elmers like the plague as it has too much water and warps my cardstock and paper).


Did I mention the ball end tool? This is important! Combined with a strait edge, before cutting parts, score in those panel lines and bends!


Seriously, that ball end tool rocks.


When I start laying out the sheet, I look for large flat areas away from bends. In this case, the two most noteworth areas (well, three...) are the roof, and walls where the treads will be attached. When I analyzed the pattern, and looked at someone elses build on the Warhammer Papercrafters Facebook page, I noted the amount of detail that will be attached on top. To facilitate a good fit, I still want these areas flat, and reinforced to ensure stability.


One of the easiest methods of reinforceing paper to reduce the warping over a large area away from a 90 degree bend is to laminate a couple sheets. Sure, I'm using index card stock that printed on, but two layers is still mroe stable than a single layer, especially on that roof. After cutting out the hull and folding it, I measured width of the hull and then cut a 50mm wide strip of bristol (scrap, or drop, from a previous project).





With everything folded, I made shure it was a bit smaller than where I was going to glue it, and test fit to ensure no conflict with the glue tabs or other features when the 50mm strip was cut to length (around 60mm long).


Test fit everything. I used blue painters tape, but any masking or drafting tape will do (if it holds long enough to fit, but doesn't stay permanently). Make sure any interior stiffening stays within the iside dimensions. As a guy who draws sheet metal parts for a living, this is critical to everything I design or draw. Makes this whole process easier to think about it from that perspective!

Next post will start with the stiffening. Happy greebleing!
 
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Once I was happy with the roof sheet, I moved on to solve my potential side sheet warping. There are several methods of using card to stiffen sheets, and I first started by taking that 50mm strip, cutting a 110mm length, and scoring it length wise every 5mm.


Inspired by extruded angles, and learning that paper holds up against warping close to 90 degree bends (exactly like sheet metal) I cut a 10mm section and folded it. The 110mm length was perfect for those side walls.


With everything test fit, it is time to glue. I used the glue stick for the flat lamination, and the wood glue spread with a toothpick for the angles cut and folded.





Note: I added some veritcal stiffeners as well, these are approx. 25mm long (once again, having drawing massives boxes of rocks [aggregate bins] with conveyors attached came in handy.... This is how a great many pieces of mining and insustrial containers are designed if they have smooth sheet metal surfaces that need to be strait for the most part).

Once the hull was glued together, I had the top and all sides ready to go. Before I move on to the bottom of the hull, I had to get the pocket for the twin linked bolter (HOLY BOLTER for cleansing the galaxy of heretics, mutants, and xenos....). This is where things get a little more interesting, as there are far fewer glue tabs....
 
...language barriers kinda suck. I am not certain I have the right keys to label the parts here as I do not have the Cyrilic letters Ukranians and Russians use (Eli Patorch the kits designer is Ukranian) to help beyond my photos. Fortunately, Patorch uses assembly drawings to transmit instructions. However, this requires careful study, and test fitting to ensure you have the right idea from the drawing. This turret pocket in the hull is just one such part.


I eventually figured out what went with the pocket floor to make it a sealed pocket. This I formed around a dowel. I kick myself for NOT wettting down the part to make the bend easier. But then, with how I sealed the part, that might been fruitless to begin with... Clear coat is wonderful at keeping moisture out, which is unfortunate when you NEED moisture. So, learn from me if you buid this kit... Cut these out, or print a spare without clear coat!


As you can see, I used blue painters tape again, from the test fit, as an extra set of fingers to hold the parts in place while the glue dried.


These are corner condition glue joints where I coated the inside corners of the parts with a bead of glue. Not as effective as welding which is what you get if you used plasticard and ran a bead of plastic cement in the joint. In fact, for those inclinded, you could cut everything as a flat and use that corner gluing with plastic cement and build this kit. Just be prepared to score a lot of panel detail, which is par for the course with plasticard scratch builds at any rate!



With only two glue tabs on the strait angles to the front glacis plate, yes, this entire pocket is a corner condition! Load a toothpick and apply liberally with the wood glue!


All that effort was totally worth it!
 
On to the Blessed (Holy) Twin Linked (dare I say heretically, double your DAKKA) bolter turret.


This part rolled and held it's shape rather well.


It had some HSS (High Speed Steel) persausion though.


The rest of the turret came together so fast, I forgot to take pictures! I rolled the body around that dowel and glued the top and bottom onto it (you guessed it, no tabs, all corner gluing...).


Fits pretty well in that pocket. Totally worth all of that work from last post.


Now, the instructions do not have a Part # 3 at all... So I cut and folded it, and took a wild guess before gluing. I also got distracted and had to walk away from the project for a few minutes (such is the call of duty when a two year old is potty training during Dad's hobby time...).


Sometimes that industry standard "get up and walk away from the drawing/3D model" trick works at home (well, all the time as I find errors in my work when I snap awake in the middle of the night and have the drawing figured out for the follwing day....). I found out where it goes after staring at the spot the whole time. Part # 3 is a support at the rear for a greeble that goes on top, the engine radiator I assume.

Goes to show you that you should enjoy this hobby in small sessions. Hull Phase 1 is complete. Sure, I'd love the time to finish the hull, but life has to happen first. That, and I might figure out the solution to another probelem or how I want to approach the next step with a better angle when I'm at work this week doing something really important. Hate it when that happens!

Happy greebling!
 

cainex1

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I may never use this information but I have a feeling a bunch of folks will, thanks for sharing.
 
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I really appreciate the super detailed posts and step by step photos. A fascinating build that I'm glad to be following!
I may never use this information but I have a feeling a bunch of folks will, thanks for sharing.

Thanks for the feedback!

My post here is more to introduce some of the details. I'm but a humble Missionary of the Emperor (well, this aspect of the 40K and Skirmish spin-off hobby at any rate)... Never mind, I AM NOT HUMBLE! I'm a Paper Zealot!

Seriously though, I'm glad I can provide this portal. Largely because of the hours, days, months, and years worth of searching for decent information on the Internet; and the memory of NOT having access to any such information when the Internet was but a theoretical pipe dream while I was growing up. Can't say I remember ever reading about card stock being used for anything other than what was buried under plasticard and clay in dioramas before I encountered the full scale hobby just a few short years ago.
 
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So, today's postings are from yesterday's work. I had about an hour, so I largely just worked with what was already built and refined a few bits and pieces. Not pictured (because my camera was not present when I starrted the session...) was using my finger to spread some glue around the movement surfaces of the turret and the body of the hull in the key slot pocket (now that I think about, I would have gotten the glue on my camera had I attempted to photograph that process.... Fortunately my tablet camera has is within a case with a sacrificial cover...).

I then proceeded to steal....er.....acquire a fingernail board (foam kind) from my wife's stash of beauty supplies. Its like those expensive hobby sanding tools, but considerably cheaper and just as effective! Taking the round turret in my hand, I sanded the edges flush and knocked off some of the glue blobs. Since the paper is treated with clear coat, some of that came off without taking paper with it. Areas where I spread the glue with my finger had dried, and sanded nice and smooth and are solid. What is great about papercraft is that the effort required to achieve a smooth surface finish is raather low. You would think it's like working with basswood or similar soft woods, I mean, its like paper is made of wood or something....




Seeing I had some more time before needing to chauffeur my kids around, I moved on to the next step to get that hull polyhedron box built. I needed to get the floor on it, or those Space Marines aren't going to get much benefit now will they! Measuring by holding up a bent strip of card (see above posts), I cut a few pieces to form cross braces on the very middle of the sheet to keep it from sagging, espcially when I add the greeblies to the bottom. This is one of those long strait runs that has a sigificant part of the surface area way from a fold. So we use the folded strips to bring folds to the middle of the sheet from the inside.



Once this was in place and drying, I start with my greeblies. First off, experience has taught me the hard way (see my MK I Dreadnought in the gallery under my paper models....) that often times, you need more than a single layer of material to make some of these greeblies really POP from the flat surface they are affixed to. So much so, on Patorch's Facebook page dedicated to Warhammer Papercraft, a lot of the builders use matte board for these parts. Really, some of the color prints laminated to matte board look awesome, because those guys are not sloopy with their glue work like I am. Eastern Europeans really have the papercrafting down along with the Asians when it comes to precision... but I digress, I'm a ham fisted yankee so I prime and paint to hide my lack of precision gluing...

Using glue stick (see above posts for specific type), I glue rough cut parts onto the bristol, and roll flat. Use a dowel, or a fancy tool found by the Speedball inks for screen printing and lenolium/wood cut block printing. Another alternative is to use a book you don't like, or if you like the heavy book you need to use, sandwich the parts between wax paper. Be advised, the wax paper and heavy book press method increases drying time do to lack of air flow, expect the center of the parts to sill be wet hours to days after pressing depending upon the moisture content of the glue you use. If you experience any warping because you pressed into using the bottle of PVA glue due to a lack of glue stick, sometimes the book press method works to flatten the parts after they are dry. Time and pressure, it's what separates graphite, coal, and diamonds; with papercraft, thankfully the time is reduced to a day or a few hours versus a couple centuries or millenia....



Sometimes you need to make educated guesses. Use the Internet and look up images of what you are building. I decided based on what I know about armor that the glacius plate needed to be thicker than most of the other greeblies I was working on. So after the first round of lamination, I cut those parts out and opted for a second round. I then noticed a couple other parts on the bottom I wanted a little thicker as well, so those joined the glacius platee for a second round of glue stick and bristol. Now this beast is truely built like a tank with that much glacius plate! I doubt a xenos scum tau railgun can't take it out with a single shot with that glacius plate!



Well, next post will show off some of the greebling process before I go on too much further with the project. These things require some thought, after all, there are going to be a few sub assemblies I need to build and prime, and likely paint, before final assembly. I'm just hopping my guesses work out alright in the end here.

Until next time, happy greebleling!
 

Here we have the basic box, it is small enough with enough bends NOT to require much for internal stiffening with the paper angles!


It did come with some greeblies to go on top, which I laminated then folded, only to have the top index card layer pop off the bristol. Don't panic, take a tooth pick or scrap paper with PVA glue, and just re-glue. Hold in place, repeat as required.


Here is an example of using a book, or in this case a binder with a slick plastic cover (containing Yaktribe Vault materials no less...). After all night, I still had wet glue in the core, but this dried within 15 minutes of sitting flat on my desk in the open air. Method works great when you have the time, and most importanly patience, to utilize it.


I learned this method on Zealot in a post about a variety of ways to make rivets. By far, this is the easiest and most effective for having round rivet heads. Dip a toothpick in your PVA glue of choice, and dot away. Allow to dry, re-apply another layer as required (as PVA shrinnks when drying). If you make a mistake, wipe it away before it dries.





I like to apply rivets as soon as possible, largely to recessed areas especially. Getting that dab of PVA in place after assembly can be a pain in some corners. It gets worse if you fail to do this early when you use other methods such as cutting tiny pieces of plastic rod or using hole punches (see above screw punch photo, yes, you can use the cutouts for greeblies like rivets...).
 
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Okay, here is the screw punch. This is a GREAT early acquistion for any model builder, plastic or paper. I'm sure it will cut soft metal, but for that there are plenty of other nicer (D2 tool steel) purpose built for it. This one is purpose built for paper, and is sharper than a leather punch, all the folks on Papermodeler and Zealot who use leather punches had to sharpen those punches to work on paper. If you want to spend the time sharpening tools instead of building models, be my guest....


So, when I punched these out, I used a piece of hard plastic, junk mail credit card sample, behind the paper. This helps you get a cleaner cut without maring the punch as much. Use a cutting mat, and you will put holes in the mat as well as have a spot where the punched circle is still attached to your sheet, not that I didn't learn the hard way myself, despite reading sound advice first.


Since primer is unlikely to make it inside the box that makes up the tow lug, I used permanent marker on the inside, a nice black one. You can use any dark color really...




Assembly of the tiedown/tow lug.


So, for small diameter (under 13mm or 1/2") circles, I recommend you cut corners. Quite literally. My Kindergarden teacher taught me this, and I blew it off for decades. Then on Zealot, Zathros and Gandolf50 both mentioned this after seeing one of my jagged circles on a turret ring. Well, trial and error, mostly error combined with being stuborn was not good to me for 30 years. Learn from my mistakes!


I eexperimented with drill bits until I found one that I got the desired outter diameter after wraping the card around. There is no exact in this process, just get a cheap set of drill bits and wipe off the oil; then test fit. Yeah, make sure you clean the oil off before you touch paper to the bit, or socket.

Did I mention clean up the tool before putting paper on it? You'd think I might have had some issues do to having to learn the hard way or something!


Some axle looking greeblies, after drying and having been wrapped around a cleaned up (that's important) drill bit


Combining the cut corners with the rivets on recessed parts.
 
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Gunsmith screw drivers make great tools for this, they are precise, and you can find ones flat enough for it. First, score the vents halfway through the laminated card stock layers. Second, using the flatest, and not quite as wide as the vent, screw driver tip press down on the top of each vent to lift it up slightly. Feel free to 'seal' with CA glue if desired.




So it is late here in the Midwestern US (three minutes past midnight), so this is it for this morning. So enjoy the work in progress pictures, and note the rivets are added as I build up. Don't forget to add rivets to those recessed areas ASAP!

Happy greebling!
 

spafe

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That rivit idea is amazing. Copying that on my plasticard stuff.

Your attention to detail is also incredible
 

Fold

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Looking good!

I question the use of PVA for rivits. I find them too indistinct and irregular, also two visits with the PVA sounds no easier than supergluing nail art beads on, which are regular and sit nicely proud of the surface.

But, look forward to seeing how they look painted.

@spafe I would definitely test the use of PVA on plasticard before committing as I think it would easily rub off during painting/storage/play!
 
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