Necromunda The Sump: General hobby venting thread (Beware: old men shouting at clouds)

I loved the idea of BFG. Bought tons of stuff, made loads of models, sold it all because no one in the area had any interest in it whatsoever. Kinda depressing how many things I sold because of that…:
 
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I'll stand up a little bit for games that take refuge in complexity. It's barely ever a good thing, and I don't think it suits tabletop games at all, but basically my point is that competitive Pokemon is pretty rad. It's a stupid tower of hundreds of creatures with dozens of options each, balanced on an eighteen-part rock-paper-scissors game, all those types further split across two completely separate axes of damage versus resilience, with temporary and permanent buffs and debuffs on top. It's a stupidly complex system that nobody would ever consider learning if not for the Pokemon brand power. But! It is really good.

There's also Path of Exile, which I think is mechanically denser still. Pokemon scratched a PvP deckbuilding itch (I also played Magic the Gathering, until recently when they did a wrong thing to the nicer of their two online clients), whereas PoE feels more about raw single-player optimisation. Not something I'm looking for, but there's a big crowd for it.
 
The game itself was great, the campaign was somewhat lacking which was a shame. Also metal battleships on flight stands was a huge mistake. Sadly, much like @Punktaku, I couldn't find many other enthusiasts. Sold my collection and regret it. Luckily this is my future.
Someone was having a lot of fun with those names. I will now forever know chaos as anarchist jarheads and see eldar as edgy space elves, or is that the dark eldar?
 
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I did not know Andy chambers was part of StarCraft 2. It makes sense though, I remember when StarCraft 1 came out and my friend sold it to me as Warhammer 40k the PC game but better.
 
The game itself was great, the campaign was somewhat lacking which was a shame. Also metal battleships on flight stands was a huge mistake. Sadly, much like @Punktaku, I couldn't find many other enthusiasts. Sold my collection and regret it. Luckily this is my future.
I have managed to maintain my 4 fleets. Two Imperial, a Space Marine, and an Ork. Now I need to make many many blast markers....
 
I'll stand up a little bit for games that take refuge in complexity. It's barely ever a good thing, and I don't think it suits tabletop games at all, but basically my point is that competitive Pokemon is pretty rad. It's a stupid tower of hundreds of creatures with dozens of options each, balanced on an eighteen-part rock-paper-scissors game, all those types further split across two completely separate axes of damage versus resilience, with temporary and permanent buffs and debuffs on top. It's a stupidly complex system that nobody would ever consider learning if not for the Pokemon brand power. But! It is really good.

There's also Path of Exile, which I think is mechanically denser still. Pokemon scratched a PvP deckbuilding itch (I also played Magic the Gathering, until recently when they did a wrong thing to the nicer of their two online clients), whereas PoE feels more about raw single-player optimisation. Not something I'm looking for, but there's a big crowd for it.
As a board gamer I like games that give you lots of options and paths to victory without being complex about it. Basically something both my kids and I can enjoy like village, ginkopolis, suburbia.

I've taught my kids gw games too. Speed freeks was popular with them. Simple racing game with guns. Although the shooting mechanism was poorly explained and it can go for a long time. Warhammer quest was not so popular. I thought it would be more popular. DND ended up being more popular with them for the story telling and because what they could do was clearer.

Dnd is a good example of complex without complexity. The mechanics are very straightforward. The complexity lies in what you can do with those mechanics. Necromunda core is a straightforward game. The core rules are pretty simple and give you a good amount of freedom. The game suffers severely from expansionpackitis. That's when a developer has a popular game they want to expand on but they mess with what makes it good.


Dnd 5e doesn't suffer from expansionpackitis. Each new book doesn't mess with the core rules. It just gives you some new races to play. Some new monsters to fight, new ways you can use the core mechanics but never replacing the core mechanics or changing them. a new place to go and a story you can follow. Necromunda would do well to follow this pattern. They kind of do it but not quite.
 
BFG DIY:
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This sparked a lifelong interest in the Warhammer universes and decades of purchases from myself and friends. Maybe we would have discovered Space Hulk and entered that way. It boggles the mind how there is no set pipeline with GW, from curious kid to diehard customer, via well done specialist games anymore. Game balance matters, clean rules design, approachable tutorials, etc. Admech was as much toy as game, with the swappable weapons in pegs. That was very appealing, to customize a figure physically and have precise rules support for it.
I can highly recommend "new" Adeptus Titanicus as a gateway Specialist Game, and a generally superb game despite some eyewatering Forgeworld prices.

2 books gives you everything you need, despite there only being 2 "factions" there's a lot of variety within that especially with the recent Traitor book and mutations, it works equally as a tight competitive game and a fun narrative game, and the rules capture the 'feel' of titans really well. It's a shame the Precept Maniple Battleforce is OOP as that was disgustingly good value, but the starter box (Not the long OOP Grandmaster box) is good value.
 
I can highly recommend "new" Adeptus Titanicus as a gateway Specialist Game, and a generally superb game despite some eyewatering Forgeworld prices.

2 books gives you everything you need, despite there only being 2 "factions" there's a lot of variety within that especially with the recent Traitor book and mutations, it works equally as a tight competitive game and a fun narrative game, and the rules capture the 'feel' of titans really well. It's a shame the Precept Maniple Battleforce is OOP as that was disgustingly good value, but the starter box (Not the long OOP Grandmaster box) is good value.
Can confirm, the game makes flanking and positioning very important and the game is fun. My problem with titanicus is imperium/chaos boys only and their adamant position to only play with horus heresy era. If I could jump in as greenskins or eldar I'd give it a thought.
 
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