N18 What to do with Web spam

The web mechanic itself isn't broken. Make a webpistol strength 1 and charge 200 credits and people will be asking how to make web pistols useable. There's nothing in the mechanic that makes it powerful by itself. Web weapons are powerful because those mechanics are combined with high strength and relatively low prices. The simplest fix, if a fix is really needed, is to just drop the strength. Drop web pistols to Str 3 and you've got a weapon that does nothing but pin 50% of the time against a T3 opponent. Drop web guns to Str 4 and its an expensive template that is a 50% shot against a T4 opponent.

But the bigger issue is web spam. One web weapon doesn't break a gang. It is a real battlefield factor, and the opponent needs to keep it in mind, but it can be accounted for. Its when there's a whole bunch of them that it changes and forces extreme responses like your suggested lasgun line. And the simplest answer there is to acknowledge that like almost any wargames, Necromunda breaks when people go hunting for extreme list builds. We can talk forever about exactly how much Necromunda is easier to break than other wargames, but that really doesn't matter. The point is any wargame needs to have players take on some responsibility to avoid doing stuff that obviously ruins the game.

I guess you're technically correct. The mechanic is only broken in combination with the weapon it's associated with. But it's not like there are other weapon options that have it. I do agree though that toning the web guns down a bit would fix the issue. As would ruling a maximum # of web weapons per gang.

I don't really think that all war games suffer these issues. Necromunda is in a weird space. It doesn't explicitly say that it's meant to be a narrative game. It's just heavily implied. So if you play it in a public setting, you can expect to get a few people who simply can't grasp why a legal list could be bad. I've had to deal with it a few times as an arbitrator.
People *should* play for the narrative and approach it with a bit of fair play and fun in mind. But some don't. So you need solutions. You can either refer to the arbitrator to solve issues, or you can come up with ways to counter spam within the existing framework.

Once you start doing that, you also see that the game is kind of built to be wonky. It's like Mario Kart or Super Smash Bros. When someone shows up with web spam, the game wants you to play the Waste territory and slaughter them in an asymmetrical ambush!
 
That first rule is good, playing Darktide the web gun there is a single target net-gun rather than a template spray, that would balance the webber a hell of a lot more.
 
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I guess you're technically correct.

The best kind of correct!

The mechanic is only broken in combination with the weapon it's associated with. But it's not like there are other weapon options that have it.

My point wasn't so much that Web has to be left alone, more that the rule and any suggested fix needs to be seen in the context of the stats of the weapons that use it. This makes it quite different to, say, Blaze, where all the of the work is tied up in the Special Rule itself. If people thought flamers were too good or too bad, then changing the weapon stats doesn't really do much because its all about that 4+ roll to set the target on fire. Web is a little different because its effectiveness is tied to its high strength working in combination with its powerful special rule. You can do a lot to reduce the power of web weapons without having to rewrite special rules.

I don't really think that all war games suffer these issues. Necromunda is in a weird space. It doesn't explicitly say that it's meant to be a narrative game. It's just heavily implied. So if you play it in a public setting, you can expect to get a few people who simply can't grasp why a legal list could be bad. I've had to deal with it a few times as an arbitrator.
People *should* play for the narrative and approach it with a bit of fair play and fun in mind. But some don't. So you need solutions. You can either refer to the arbitrator to solve issues, or you can come up with ways to counter spam within the existing framework.

I've never played any wargame where the conversation around the game wasn't at least 50% dominated by people talking about balance. Some games have it worse, some have it less. Necromunda is worse than most, partly from some bad design choices, but mostly as an inevitability of having such a massive range and diversity of options available.

My Necromunda group has had very few issues. I had absolute nightmares with Warhammer Fantasy 6th, and that was meant to be the most balanced version of the game. It just comes down to the playing group and the absence of players who are willing to push things in to not fun territory for a win, and also the absence of players who will moan and claim everything is unfair if they come on the wrong end of it.

I think you make a good point about it being a difficult game to run in a public setting. Among guys who don't all play together often, and with people coming and going it can be hard to build up a good culture. That matters for more than just controlling power balance. It also matters for how you play the game. More than a lot of games, there's a lot of ways to play Necromunda. I used to play the original Necromunda with schoolmates as a teenager, and we played a game of carefully growing our gangs and never staying too long in a fight. With my new group of guys who just want to drink a beer and roll some dice, it took me a while to fit in to the more aggressive style, taking risks as they accepted guys might die as they attempted more spectacular fights.

Once you start doing that, you also see that the game is kind of built to be wonky. It's like Mario Kart or Super Smash Bros. When someone shows up with web spam, the game wants you to play the Waste territory and slaughter them in an asymmetrical ambush!

And this is the eternal problem. There are always ways to counter players who are taking power builds that aren't fun, but those things are themselves not fun. It never ends well.
 
It just comes down to the playing group and the absence of players who are willing to push things in to not fun territory for a win, and also the absence of players who will moan and claim everything is unfair if they come on the wrong end of it.

You've nailed it here. The group is so important. That's not to say the game can't be run with rules lawyers. The job of the arbitrator just becomes very different (and honestly less fun, lol).